Dit even terzijde

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Jan van der Doe
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Re: Dit even terzijde

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » 11 nov 2018 19:24

Vandaag is hier in Canada en andere geallierde landen die in de eerste wereld oorlog (1914-1918) betrokken waren het vandaag 11 november 100 jaar gelen is dat het einde van de oorlog was herdacht.



Hier een editorial in de Manchester Guardian van 12 november 2018.

Afbeelding

The war is over, and in a million households fathers and mothers, wives and sisters, will breathe freely, relieved at length of all dread of that curt message which has shattered the hope and joy of so many. The war is over. The drama is played out.

After years of tedium there opened on March 21 a short and sharp fifth act of swift and surprising changes. Our language misses that single word applied by the Greeks to those sudden and complete changes of fortune which they regarded as appropriate to the final act of a tragic drama. No historic change of fortune so swift, so pulverising to the loser, has occurred since Napoleon's retreat from Moscow as the reversal that began on July 18. And since July 18, blow has followed blow with a rapidity which, if it has almost bewildered the victors, must have stupefied the enemy.

The old order in Europe has perished. The new is hardly born, and no one knows what its lineaments will be. Tomorrow we shall be brought up against the hard immediate problems of re-establishment. Before we grapple with these, let us give a moment to the review of the position gained and try our best to sum up the result of four tremendous years as it may be measured by the historian.

From Waterloo to Mons there elapsed almost 100 years. The first part of this period was one of peace and progress, industry and optimism. Below the surface were seething forces of democracy and nationalism and soon these began to break forth to disturb the complacency of statesmen. But for the thinker these forces were full of hope, and the men of the mid-19th century foresaw a better order, a civilised humanity, a race dedicated to the works of peace and the cultivation of a gentler and yet a nobler life. Towards the end of the century their optimism gave way to a gloomier view. Unrest and anxiety took hold of the more thoughtful minds. Democracy had everywhere progressed but had not brought healing.

The burden of armaments lay heavy on the nations, and the war cloud lowered dark on the horizon. The main cause of this change was the success of the Prussian system under Bismarck. The year 1870 divides the period of which we have spoken into two nearly equal halves, of progress and hope on the one side, and reaction and apprehension on the other. The union of Germany was, indeed, accepted, even welcomed, by liberally minded men as the overdue consummation of a long and unhappy political travail, but the mode in which it was accomplished turned out to be more fateful to Germany and the world than the achievement itself.

From 1870 men began to accept the doctrine of blood and iron. Ideas, arguments, appeals to right and justice took a lower place. Force and fraud seemed to make their way, if only men would be thorough in the use of them. The Prussian idea enjoyed all the prestige of immense success, and the pre-eminence of Germany in many fields of learning, backed with this prestige, won its way in the regions of the mind.

The idea of humanity receded in favour of the state, freedom gave way to discipline and organisation, right to the strong hand, reason to passion, and self-restraint to ambition. Meanwhile in one country after another there arose the sense of instability. It began to be felt that things could not last as they were. The piled-up armaments were like vast electric accumulators awaiting their discharge.

In England these influences penetrated more slowly, but from the time when Germany set out seriously to become a great naval power we felt that we, too, were being drawn in. For long years, even to the last, many of us hoped that ours might be the balancing power, so exerted as to deter either side in the great continental combinations from a fatal plunge. But it was not to be.

The Prussian idea swept Germany out of itself and gave to the world the final demonstration of its naked deformity. The circumstances of the war were such that, a very few individuals apart, it united all the humanitarian enthusiasm, all the political love of liberty, which nowadays go to the support of peace, in favour of a stern resistance, carried through, at whatever cost, to indubitable victory. The defeat of Prussianism was rightly stated by Mr Asquith at the outset as the object which included all others. Prussianism - an idea, a system, not a nation or an army - is hopelessly defeated today. Its hold on the world's future is gone, and the human mind is empty, swept and garnished, of its worst idol. That is the real and decisive victory in the war.

By the hundred thousand, young men have died for the hope of a better world. They have opened for us the way. If, as a people, we can be wise and tolerant and just in peace as we have been resolute in war, we shall build them the memorial that they have earned in the form of a world set free from military force, national tyrannies and class oppressions, for the pursuit of a wider justice in the spirit of a deeper and more human religion.

• Manchester Guardian, Nov 12 1918
Vriendelijke groet
Jan.


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Leven niet


Jan van der Doe
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Re: Dit even terzijde

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » 27 nov 2018 17:34

Afbeelding
slecht Engels

‘Threat to Dutch in higher education is no idle chitchat’
Columns November 27, 2018
Photo: DutchNews.nl

It’s alarming that the education minister seems oblivious to the demise of Dutch in higher education, say academics Annette de Groot, Erik Jurgens, Jean Pierre Rawie and Ad Verbrugge. The language policy of education minister Ingrid van Engelshoven is like a garden where English is allowed to bloom unhindered while Dutch is withering on the vine. In a recent radio-interview the increasing influence of English in higher education was recognised at once, but then the subject was conspicuously avoided. All the minister was willing to say was that we should not accept the prevailing idea that all teaching is already being done in English. ‘Higher education is still mainly conducted in Dutch’, she said. In other words, the public commotion about the unbridled colonisation of Dutch higher education by the English language is just so much idle chitchat. This stance wilfully denies the disastrous effects of anglicisation on the quality of Dutch education, and on the Dutch language itself. It also legitimises the one-sided approach to internationalisation favoured by universities. This simply comes down to removing the language barrier for foreign students so radically that in many cases not a hint of Dutch remains. Native language No other European country has allowed its higher education to be taken over by English quite on the same scale. No other country shows so little appreciation for its native language. Besides, had the minister had the relevant data to hand she would have known that English is already the dominant language in Dutch universities. In the last academic year almost half of all university programmes was exclusively conducted in English, including almost three quarters of the master’s degree courses (512 out of 811) and a quarter of the bachelor’s degrees (94 out of 406). This year will probably see the tipping point from more degrees taught in Dutch to more of them taught in English. In addition, a large part of the remaining courses is euphemistically called bilingual while, in fact, they are largely taught in English. In many of these courses all lectures are exclusively in English. Replacing Dutch with English has been an enormously successful recruitment tool. Among first-year students the number of foreign students increased spectacularly in the year following anglicisation of the programme. Psychology Take as an example a number of the psychology courses across the country. Twente University saw the number of foreign students in the psychology programme rise from 50% to 80% percent at a stroke, while at Maastricht University showed a rise from 52% to 86%. The Amsterdam-based universities VU and UvA made the biggest leaps in numbers of foreign psychology students, from 5% to 57% and from 3% to 53% t respectively. But now the universities are reaping what they sowed with their less than creative approach to internationalisation. They can no longer cope with the increase in the number of students, which during the last couple of years was primarily due to the rise in the number of students from abroad. And the emphasis on English has other, unintended, effects. Take the consequences for language and the use of language. Dutch students and lecturers are compelled to use English. But their English is demonstrably worse than their Dutch, in contradiction to the much touted pr stories that Dutch people speak such excellent English. This fact limits their ability to understand and to express themselves. And that again affects their thinking processes, which are closely bound up with language. No improvement The level of Dutch present with students in all-English degree courses stays at secondary school level and does not improve during their studies. At the same time students will seldom reach the academic level in their English that they could have achieved had they been taught in their own language. Worse still, most students will have to function in their chosen professions with an inadequately developed level of Dutch. That is a pitiful state of affairs. Lastly, Dutch as a scientific language will gradually disappear. It is a sad fact that concern for the conservation of the Dutch language is often labelled as creepy nationalism. That is not at all what it is about. What it is about is the balance in the use of Dutch and English. So minister, put your gardening clogs on and tend to that beautiful indigenous plant that is our language! Annette de Groot is emeritus professor of language psychology at the University of Amsterdam. Erik Jurgens is emeritus professor of law at the University of Maastricht and the Vrije Universiteit. Jean Pierre Rawie is a poet. Ad Verbrugge is senior lecturer in cultural philosophy at the VU and chairman of Beter Onderwijs Nederland.

This article appeared earlier in the Volkskrant
Vriendelijke groet
Jan.


Varen is noodzakelijk
Leven niet

Jan Stolp
Berichten: 1955
Lid geworden op: 30 dec 2004 21:55
Locatie: IJlst

Re: Dit even terzijde

Bericht door Jan Stolp » 27 nov 2018 20:16

Helemaal mee eens,hoewel ik mezelf echt wel anglofiel kan noemen ,vind ik de invloed van het Engels op de Nederlandse taal heel erg jammer.
De uitdrukkingsvaardig heid gaat achteruit men gebruikt te pas en te onpas engelse termen ,vaak uit gemak zucht.
Vandaag nog zei iemand mij ter afscheid via de telefoon "ik zie jou"..... ( ik keek verschrikt om me heen want zij zat in Amsterdam en ik in IJlst...)
Dat moet Nederlands voorstellen.
Groeten
Jan

Jan van der Doe
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Re: Dit even terzijde

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » 05 sep 2019 00:22

Afbeelding
Afbeelding
Afbeelding
Afbeelding
Afbeelding

Groet
Jan
Vriendelijke groet
Jan.


Varen is noodzakelijk
Leven niet

Louis O.
Berichten: 1241
Lid geworden op: 31 dec 2004 21:23
Locatie: Vlissingen

Re: Dit even terzijde

Bericht door Louis O. » 05 sep 2019 13:55

Bedankt voor het delen van de Memorial, Jan

Jan van der Doe
Berichten: 7149
Lid geworden op: 30 dec 2004 16:02
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Re: Dit even terzijde

Bericht door Jan van der Doe » 07 sep 2019 21:01

Afbeelding
Afbeelding
Afbeelding

Komt er dan nooit geen eind aan.

Groet,
Jan
Vriendelijke groet
Jan.


Varen is noodzakelijk
Leven niet

willem269
Berichten: 24
Lid geworden op: 20 sep 2010 07:25

Gepensioneerden voor kerstverhaal

Bericht door willem269 » 28 okt 2019 17:04

Hallo, voor een kerstverhaal voor een maritiem weekblad ben ik op zoek naar enkele gepensioneerde zeevarenden die een verhaal hebben over hun meest bijzondere kerstvieringen op zee of in verre havens. Kerst in een vliegende storm, in windstille verzengende hitte, het gemis van thuis zijn met kerst, hoe de sfeer aan boord er toch in gehouden werd, hoe de kok er toch nog iets bijzonders van maakte. Het liefst mensen uit het noord-oosten van het land omdat ik daar in de buurt woon. Het idee is om in de loop van november een aantal mensen bij elkaar te brengen en hun verhalen op te tekenen.
In eerste instantie kunnen we via privé bericht wat contactgegevens uitwisselen.
Ik wacht af, groeten,
Willem



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